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PNLV Blog

COVID19 – What to know

I. Unemployment

https://www.uc.pa.gov/unemployment-benefits/file/Pages/Filing%20Instructions.aspx

What you need to file unemployment:

  • SSN
  • Home address and mailing address (if different)
  • Telephone number
  • Valid email
  • PIN if you’ve filed for unemployment before
  • Direct deposit bank information (optional) – bank name, address, account and routing number.
  • Employer’s name, address and phone number
  • Employer’s PA UC account number (if known)
  • First and last day worked with employer
  • Reason for leaving
  • Pension or severance package information (if applicable)

If your claims are filed on time, you’ll get payment in four weeks if your claims are filed

You need to say you’re “available” for work—You won’t get benefits if you don’t

Every Sunday you file for the previous week

II. Paid Sick Leave

https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/pandemic/ffcra-employee-paid-leave

Paid Sick Leave Q and A

https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/pandemic/ffcra-questions#12

You can get two weeks (up to 80 hours) paid at your regular amount if:

  • there is a quarantine or isolation order from your local authorities, or
  • you’re experiencing symptoms and seeking a diagnosis, or
  • you’ve been told by a doctor that you might have COVID-19

You can get two weeks (up to 80 hours) paid at 2/3 your regular amount if:

  • you’re taking care of someone who’s quarantined, or
  • you have to take care of a child whose school is closed

You can get 10 more weeks at 2/3 your regular amount if you have to take care of a child whose school is closed.

https://www.lvhn.org/mylvhn

To be tested for the Coronavirus you must have used one of the above resources. If you don’t have insurance you’ll receive a bill for testing but won’t be required to pay.

If you go into the Assess and Test office, you will check in at the registration desk. Provide your number and wait in your car. They will call your phone when you can be seen for your test.

LVHN COVID-19 Assess and Test–17th Street 
1730 Chew St., Allentown, PA 18104
Monday-Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday-Sunday: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

 (Other LV sites on the website)

Saint Luke’s

– Download the app for a video visit

https://stlukesapp.org

– Saint Luke’s Coronavirus hotline: 1-866-STLUKES (785-8537), option 7

PA Department of Health—General points

https://www.health.pa.gov/topics/disease/coronavirus/Pages/Coronavirus.aspx

– If you don’t have a healthcare provider and are experiencing extreme symptoms (trouble breathing, pressure in the chest, confusion or inability to move, bluish lips/face): call 1-877-PA-HEALTH.

If that doesn’t work, call your local emergency department. Say you have suspected COVID when you call. Try to put on a mask before going into any medical offices.

– To get a test, you might need preregistration and a doctor’s script

– If you or someone you know is experiencing a mental health crisis, contact the Crisis Text Line by texting PA to 741-741.

PA Department of Health—Health Insurance and COVID-19

https://www.health.pa.gov/topics/disease/Pages/Coronavirus-Insurance.aspx

  • All ACA-compliant plans cover testing—Some cover without a co-pay  
  • Medical Assistance covers testing and treatment—If you can’t afford a co-pay you will not be denied treatment, although you might be sent a bill
  • IF YOU HAVE MEDICAID you will not have a co-pay for testing

https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/economic-impact-payment-information-center

More info on scenarios in which people would and would not get the stimulus:

https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/non-filers-enter-payment-info-here-tool-scenarios

General info on filing taxes:

https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/whats-hot

  • $1,200 per person, $500 per child
  • You can get the stimulus if you’re a US citizen, permanent resident or qualifying resident alien AND have a social security# valid for employment

NOTE on SS# and “valid for employment”:

  • If you were a U.S. citizen when you received your SSN, then it is valid for employment.
  •  If “Not Valid for Employment” is printed on your Social Security card but your immigration status has changed and you’re now a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, ask the SSA for a new Social Security card.
  • If “Valid for Work Only With DHS Authorization” is printed on your Social Security card, the required SSN only as long as the Department of Homeland Security authorization is valid.
  • The deadline to file and pay taxes is extended to July 15, 2020
  • Do NOT use the Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Heretool if you have or will be filing 2019 taxes.
  • The following people will get stimulus checks automatically:
  • Individuals who filed a federal income tax for 2018 or 2019
  • Social Security retirement, disability (SSDI), survivor benefits, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) WITH NO DEPENDENTS
  • Recipients of Veterans Affairs benefits WITH NO DEPENDENT
  • Individuals who receive Railroad Retirement benefits WITH NO DEPENDENTS
  • You SHOULD use the Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Heretool if you:
  • Are a U.S. citizen or permanent resident,
  • Had gross income that did not exceed $12,200 ($24,400 for married couples) for 2019, and
  • Did not file a return for 2018 or 2019 and were not otherwise required to file a federal income tax return for 2019.

Part-time employees can also get sick leave. Sick leave is calculated based on the number of hours you work.

* Only for companies of less than 500 people and more than 50 people.

III. What to do if you have the Coronavirus/ Think you have the Coronavirus/ How to prepare generally  

https://lulac.org/covid19/Covid19_Flyer-IamSick.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/index.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fhcp%2Fguidance-prevent-spread.html

If you have mild symptoms:

Wash your hands

Cover sneeze/cough

Don’t share cups, bowls, towels, limit what you touch

Isolate yourself if possible

Wash and disinfect surfaces

Wear a mask

Wash laundry

Throw away tissues

Avoid preparing food

Spray with disinfectant and air dry

Close the door but open a window

Take acetaminophen to bring down your fever

Call before going to the doctor’s office or hospital

Do not bring children or family members to the doctor if you have to go

Come out of isolation when it’s been three days without a fever (without meds), seven days since symptoms started, and respiratory symptoms are improving

Masks—Wear a homemade or cloth mask—Remember the saying: “My mask protects you, my mask protects me.”

Lehigh Valley Health Network

– If you think you have coronavirus or have been exposed, you can have a free video screening or e-visit at

https://www.mylvhn.org/MyChart/Authentication/Login?

  • You can also call the nurse information line at

1-888-402-LVHN.

  • You can also complete a video visit by downloading this app:
  • If you have to go to the ER and have COVID-19, insurance carriers must cover emergency service at in-network levels
  • Call the PA Insurance Department if you have any questions about your coverage or have an unexpected bill (877) 881-6388
  • If you have Medicare and have questions, call (800) 548-9034
  • If you have Medical Assistance and have questions, call 1-800-537-8862 .

PA Department of Heath—For community leaders

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/organizations/index.html

CDC—How to Prepare yourself and your family

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/checklist-household-ready.html

  • Ask neighbors how they’ve planned
  • Create a list of local organizations you and your household can contact in case you need access to information, healthcare services, support, and resources.
  • Create an emergency contact list including family, friends, neighbors, carpool drivers, healthcare providers, teachers, employers, the local public health department, and other community resources.
  • If you are living with a high-risk individual it’s essential to know what medications they’re on and to have extras on hand. 

CDC—Living in close quarters

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/living-in-close-quarters.html

  • Choose two lower-risk people to run errands
  • On public transit, keep a 6-foot distance. Try to aoid touching handrails, etc. Wash hands or use hand sanitizer as soon as possible after leaving.
  • Try to avoid sharing a car with another household. If you must share a car, try to keep windows open or put AC in non-recirculation mode.
  • People over 65 and people with serious medical conditions should avoid watching children
  • If someone in the house is sick, choose one person to take care of them. Have another adult care for other household members.

Sharing a bedroom with someone who is sick:

  • Keep air circulating—Window or fan
  • Sleep head to toe
  • Put a curtain, large cardboard, screen etc. around the sick person
  • If possible, the person who is sick should clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces, including in the bathroom

IV. Stimulus

General Stimulus Q & A

  • Receive veterans benefits, veterans disability, or veterans pension and did NOT pay 2018 or 2019 taxes

Use this link for the Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Heretool

https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus/non-filers-enter-payment-info-here

  • Additional info on stimulus qualifications and payments:
  • If someone else would claim you as a dependent, you do NOT get a stimulus check.
  • If you have a child 18 or older, it is better to NOT claim them as a dependent. If you claim them as a dependent, they won’t be able to get a stimulus and you won’t receive the $500 child credit for them.
  • You can get the $500 credit for grandchildren if you’re the primary caregiver.
  • Other general info:
  • How long are stimulus payments available? Payments will be made throughout the rest of 2020. If you don’t receive a payment this year, you can also claim it by filing a tax return for 2020 next year.
  • Your stimulus payment will NOT be reduced if you owe taxes or owe other debts, EXCEPT if you owe past-due child support.
  • If you don’t have a bank account on file with the IRS your paper check will be mailed to the address on your most recent tax return or the most recent address on file with the post office.
  • If the bank account on file isn’t valid anymore, the bank will reject the deposit and a paper check will be sent.
  • Beware of scams! The IRS will never:
  • Contact you to request personal or bank information.
  • Demand immediate payment with a prepaid debit gift card, gift card, or wire transfer
  • Threaten to arrest you or call the police
  • Demand you pay without giving you a chance to appeal
  • Ask for credit or debit numbers over the phone

** Watch out for websites and social media posts that say you need to pay to get your stimulus!

Categories
PNLV Blog

ACHIP Community Health Worker Profile – Jamie Santana

The Allentown Children’s Health Improvement Project (ACHIP) was launched in 2016 thanks to a $1.91 million, 30-month grant from The Dorothy Rider Pool Health Care Trust. The new program brings together Lehigh Valley Health Network’s Department of Community Health and Women and Children’s services along with the Children’s Hospital at Lehigh Valley Hospital, and Promise Neighborhoods of the Lehigh Valley in a partnership. The program’s primary goal is to improve the health of pregnant women and young children in Center City Allentown through home visits for early intervention. A staff of bilingual community health workers from the neighborhood surrounding the Neighborhood Improvement Zone operates out of PNLV’s Allentown Promise Neighborhood office in downtown Allentown. APN uses its strong relationship with downtown residents to connect parents with young children and pregnant women to the ACHIP services.

The health workers are embedded in the community they serve in order to better cultivate relationships with residents, leading to trust of the local healthcare system, which is a critical component to the program’s success with this at-risk population. Here is a profile on one of them – Jamie Santana.

 

Santana_Jamie1. What made you want to work on the ACHIP program?

For the past five years I have worked as a Community Health Worker with the Department of Community Health at LVHN on an asthma program that assisted families and children ages 1-14 years old. I provided families with education on asthma medication, and assisted in the referral process to local organizations depending on the need.

What made me want to work with ACHIP is because it assists pregnant women and families with children from birth to age 5. I had already been familiar with this population and recognized that there are many young parents in Allentown in need of parenting education and guidance. I thought this would be another opportunity to continue making a difference in family’s lives. There are so many families that are broken and in need of guidance, as well as someone to trust.

 

2. What interests you most about the work you do in the community through the ACHIP program?

I enjoy listening to people’s life story. Each person has a story to tell about their life and the things they have experienced, both negative and positive. Each story is unique and I have the opportunity to take their story and express to families how some of the struggles they have encountered still have a purpose and could be used for good. These families have real struggles in their day to day life. Most feel like their stuck and can’t move forward. Others have been labelled, rejected and told they have no worth. My job is to help them see past all of that and find their purpose if not for themselves than for their children. Ultimately its empowering families to make changes to have better outcomes and look back to see how far they have come and they worked hard and can say “I did it!”

 

3. Since the home visitations started, what types of things have you been able to help the new moms and moms-to-be about with when it comes to caring for themselves and/or their child?

There are so many needs that families have. One is not having enough baby formula. I had to assist a mom who just had her newborn and WIC was not answering their phones for a week. I had a stock in my office that had been given to me before the program began because I knew this would be an issue for families.

 

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PNLV Blog

ACHIP Community Health Worker Profile – Kelly D Brown

The Allentown Children’s Health Improvement Project (ACHIP) was launched in 2016 thanks to a $1.91 million, 30-month grant from The Dorothy Rider Pool Health Care Trust. The new program brings together Lehigh Valley Health Network’s Department of Community Health and Women and Children’s services along with the Children’s Hospital at Lehigh Valley Hospital, and Promise Neighborhoods of the Lehigh Valley in a partnership. The program’s primary goal is to improve the health of pregnant women and young children in Center City Allentown through home visits for early intervention. A staff of bilingual community health workers from the neighborhood surrounding the Neighborhood Improvement Zone operates out of PNLV’s Allentown Promise Neighborhood office in downtown Allentown. APN uses its strong relationship with downtown residents to connect parents with young children and pregnant women to the ACHIP services.

The health workers are embedded in the community they serve in order to better cultivate relationships with residents, leading to trust of the local healthcare system, which is a critical component to the program’s success with this at-risk population. Here is a profile on one of them – Kelly D. Brown.

 

Kelly D Brown1. What made you want to work on the ACHIP program?

I love helping people. ACHIP promotes helping pregnant moms and their young children, a population which is near and dear to my heart.

 

2. What interests you most about the work you do in the community through the ACHIP program?

To provide community resources, to empower families to become self-efficient, and to promote a healthy way of living.

 

3. Since the home visitations started, what types of things have you been able to help the new moms and moms-to-be about with when it comes to caring for themselves and/or their child?

I’m able to provide resources such as breast pumps, information on WIC, and make sure they have health insurance. I also can connect the family with childcare services if needed.

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PNLV Blog

ACHIP Community Health Worker Profile – Denisette Irizarry

The Allentown Children’s Health Improvement Project (ACHIP) was launched in 2016 thanks to a $1.91 million, 30-month grant from The Dorothy Rider Pool Health Care Trust. The new program brings together Lehigh Valley Health Network’s Department of Community Health and Women and Children’s services along with the Children’s Hospital at Lehigh Valley Hospital, and Promise Neighborhoods of the Lehigh Valley in a partnership. The program’s primary goal is to improve the health of pregnant women and young children in Center City Allentown through home visits for early intervention. A staff of bilingual community health workers from the neighborhood surrounding the Neighborhood Improvement Zone operates out of PNLV’s Allentown Promise Neighborhood office in downtown Allentown. APN uses its strong relationship with downtown residents to connect parents with young children and pregnant women to the ACHIP services.

The health workers are embedded in the community they serve in order to better cultivate relationships with residents, leading to trust of the local healthcare system, which is a critical component to the program’s success with this at-risk population. Here is a profile on one of them – Denisette Irizarry.

 

Denisette Irizarry1. What made you want to work on the ACHIP program?

I know the importance of, and am passionate about, the health and quality of life for children, young mothers and families. These are exactly the community members that the ACHIP program is designed to help. I love the idea of being able to work with mothers from pregnancy and into the early years of life for their children.

2. What interests you most about the work you do in the community through the ACHIP program?

I am able to work closely with families and our community partners while serving as a role model for our clients (especially the young mothers). I am happy to serve as an advocate to our families and be involved in helping to identify and address some of the needs of our community. I am also interested in how the work we do with the ACHIP program today will benefit the families and other community-based programs tomorrow.

3. Since the home visitations started, what types of things have you been able to help the new moms and moms-to-be about with when it comes to caring for themselves and/or their child?

Our team has succeeded in connecting our families to resources for parenting and prenatal support, rental assistance programs, furniture, early education programs and child care services. With the help of the nurse navigator and counselors on our team, we’ve provided referrals to services that address physical and mental health as well any child development concerns.